This Company is Nailing Inclusion at the Best Time

One of the things we get to do at Holistic is visit client offices and see the environments they have created. We are always on the lookout for great examples of inclusion at work. 

Last week, we visited our partners at Cushman & Wakefield and heard an amazing story. We were talking about the different ways that diversity and inclusion manifest themselves and the topic came up about Cushman & Wakefield having gone public last year. 

The team at Cushman & Wakefield mentioned something incredible — that in advance of ringing the opening bell  they had gone through a process to intentionally ensure that the folks on stage would be representative of what their organization looks like. In fact, they said that they had so many different people that they couldn’t do the actual bell ringing — they had to do a separate pic because they had such a vision about who they wanted on stage. 

The picture that a company takes when it goes public — for that small sliver of companies that make it to that point — lives forever.

Check out the amazing pic that Cushman & Wakefield took:

image1.jpeg

Here’s the best part. Not only did they get this incredible picture, but they memorialized it as part of a coffee table book about the IPO that was distributed to teammates and is around the office, and they even included some text telling the story behind what they had endeavored to accomplish. 

At Holistic, we often say that D&I is not something you do from 3:30 to 4:30 on Thursday afternoon in the D&I meeting — it is a living embodiment of your values that has to be woven into everything you do. Congrats to the Cushman & Wakefield team on nailing this and creating an example for us all. 

image2.jpeg

The NYSE welcomes Cushman & Wakefield (NYSE: CWK) to celebrate their IPO. Cushman & Wakefield chose 14 employees from across the world to represent the firm on the bell podium. The global real estate leader is excited to send a message that they represent "what's next" for the real estate services industry.

Tom Alexander